Saturday, 16 December 2017

Last minute gifts: Chelsea Green (books)

Chelsea Green Publishing

Founded in 1984, Chelsea Green Publishing is recognized as a leading publisher of books on the politics and practice of sustainable living, publishing authors who bring in-depth, practical knowledge to life, and give readers hands-on information related to organic farming and gardening, permaculture, ecology, the environment, simple living, food, sustainable business and economics, green building, and more. New releases include Holistic Goat Care (a must buy, surely?) Joel Salatin's Your Successful Farm Business and Kate Raworth's Doughnut Economics, already a classic.

Friday, 15 December 2017

Permaculture and sales organisations (#journal)

Responding to evidence in Dixon and Adamson's (2011) “Challenger Sale” that the sales management system employed by most of today's sales organizations failed to detect and respond to significant changes in the sales environment years ago, this research examines the concept of sales system sustainability. Borrowing from the field of eco-science where the concept of sustainability has been largely developed, this theoretical research introduces Holmgren's (2002) permaculture principles to the sales literature and offers a conceptual application of these principles in the context of industrial selling. It posits that application of these principles will aid the sales organization's acquisition, dissemination and application of knowledge, effectively positioning the organization for greater endurance and sustainability going forward. In addition to offering managerial implications throughout, this paper concludes by providing a road map for future research inquiry.

Thursday, 14 December 2017

Regenerative farming in India (video)

13th International Permaculture Convergence India 2017

Streamed live on Nov 25, 2017
Live | 13th International Permaculture Convergence India 2017, IPC India 2017

Dr Claude Alvares discusses the crisis of climate change in India, and how permaculture and small scale organic farming can help. Sorry for the poor sound quality and the shaky start!

 

Wednesday, 13 December 2017

IPC India in 8 minutes (video)

The 13th IPC part 1: Conference

The 13th IPC part 2: Convergence

In this era of recurring economic, ecological and societal crises it is more important than ever to conserve and rejuvenate our natural resources! Based on the three ethics of Earth Care, People Care & Fair Share, permaculture initiatives around the globe are striving to create regenerative systems within a wide range of disciplines like farming, building, economics and education that help achieve sustainable livelihoods and secure basic human needs while protecting the environment. As part of this all-embracing shift towards more stable, harmonious, and resilient living systems, the main theme of the IPC India 2017 is ‘Towards Healthy Societies’.

Monday, 11 December 2017

4 myths on women in agriculture (journal)

Women in agriculture: Four myths

Despite the emerging global movement for reliable indicators, well-intentioned but statistically unfounded stylized facts on women, agriculture, and the environment continue to circulate. This paper inspects four pervasive gender myths: 1) Women account for 70% of the world's poor; 2) Women produce 60–80% of the world's food; 3) Women own 1% of the world's land; and 4) Women are better stewards of the environment. These claims are myths. Like all myths, they embody an important truth, that women control fewer resources than those required to fulfill their responsibilities to ensure food and nutrition security. However, none of these myths are based on sound empirical evidence. To develop effective policies to promote food security, it is necessary to have appropriate data on women's and men's roles in food production and natural resource management and the gendered constraints that they face. By evaluating the data and assumptions behind these myths, we contribute to both the academic and policy conversations on gender and rural development, making the case for collecting and using better data to capture the variation—over space and time—in the roles and status of women.

Sunday, 10 December 2017

Urban foraging (journal)

Urban foraging: a ubiquitous human practice but overlooked by urban planners, policy and research

Although hardly noticed or formally recognised, urban foraging probably occurs in all urban settings around the world. The authors draw from research in India, South Africa, Sweden, and the US to demonstrate the ubiquity and varied nature of urban foraging. They distil seven themes that characterise urban foraging. The species used and the local practices vary between contexts, and are in constant flux as urban ecological and social settings change. This requires that urban foragers are knowledgeable about diverse species, harvest locations, and rights of access, and that their practices are adaptable to changing contexts. Most cities have some forms of regulations that prohibit or discourage urban foraging, but a few important exceptions that can provide prototypes and lessons for other cities.